Consider This from NPR : NPR

Women wait outside an Apple store as it prepared for its grand opening in Beijing in July 2020. Despite increased U.S.-China tensions, including trade friction, the world’s two largest economies still have one of the world’s largest trading relationships.

Ng Han Guan/AP


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Ng Han Guan/AP


Women wait outside an Apple store as it prepared for its grand opening in Beijing in July 2020. Despite increased U.S.-China tensions, including trade friction, the world’s two largest economies still have one of the world’s largest trading relationships.

Ng Han Guan/AP

In many parts of the U.S., China remains a huge business opportunity despite recent friction. That’s the country where Apple makes its phones and Nike stitches its shoes. Yet inside the Washington Beltway, China is a security threat. Full stop. It’s one of the few things Democrats, Republicans and most everyone else in the capital agree on.

NPR correspondents Greg Myre and John Ruwitch report on this gap between how China is viewed in Washington policy circles and how many outside the proverbial beltway think about the country.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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This episode was produced by Lee Hale and Sam Gringlas. It was edited by Fatma Tanis and Brianna Scott with help from Greg Myre. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.