Tripadvisor Is a Media Business So Why Did It Unload These 8 Brands?

Tripadvisor Is a Media Business So Why Did It Unload These 8 Brands?
Tripadvisor Is a Media Business So Why Did It Unload These 8 Brands?

To the uninitiated, it might be easy to miss the fact that Tripadvisor, with all its click-based advertising, is essentially a media company. Why then did it dispose this week of eight of its Smarter Travel Media brands?

The transaction took place without an official Tripadvisor press release, let alone a financial filing. There will be no countdown to await regulatory approval. That’s because the asset disposal, which involved no employees because they had already been transferred within the company or furloughed, was inconsequential to Tripadvisor’s financial results. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

In the deal, Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Hopjump, a marketing company offering travel deals, acquired eight of Tripadvisor’s less-well-known travel-oriented media companies, including Smarter Travel, Airfarewatchdog, BookingBuddy, OneTime, Oyster.com, Family Vacation Critic, What To Pack, and Holiday Watchdog.

Tripadvisor CEO Steve Kaufer

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It’s time for business journalism to break with its conservative past

Halfway through 2020, the world is in many kinds of trouble. We face another global economic crisis; the worst pandemic in a century; a veering back toward nationalism and authoritarianism; widening wealth and income gaps in many countries; an ongoing failure to rectify gender inequity and racial injustice; and, of course, climate change, an existential challenge that threatens us all. It’s increasingly evident that each of these systemic problems is connected by both cause and effect to the others. Journalists have an urgent role to play: We can expose those connections, explain risks, and make sense of complex events. But the media—and business journalism in particular—has not risen to this occasion.

Business publications have the access, the context, and the duty to tease out the financial forces underpinning all of these problems. But we are part of the system we report on, along with the companies we

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Verizon unveils new business plan with the goal of going carbon neutral by 2035 and retraining 500,000 employees for emerging tech jobs

Better Capitalism
Better Capitalism
Hans Vestberg
Hans Vestberg

Kevork Djansezian / Getty

  • Verizon announced Tuesday it’s launching a new business plan called Citizen Verizon, which includes a number of socially responsible goals, like becoming carbon neutral by 2035. 

  • Diego Scotti, executive vice president and chief marketing officer for Verizon, said that the company including socially responsible goals in its business strategy is an important distinction. It means the company is encompassing stakeholder capitalism in its business model. 

  • Scotti agreed that more brands are moving toward stakeholder capitalism, the belief that companies should be accountable to not only their shareholders, but to their workers and communities in which they do business.

  • Other companies like Microsoft, Amazon, and Unilever have recently shared pledges to become carbon neutral (or carbon negative) in the coming years. 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Verizon, one of the country’s largest telecommunications providers, announced Tuesday it is launching a

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How Ocado went from understated British grocer to an $18.4 billion tech giant, as the coronavirus pandemic confirms the future of grocery shopping is online

"Bots" are seen on the grid (or "The Hive") of Ocado's "smart platform" in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.
“Bots” are seen on the grid (or “The Hive”) of Ocado’s “smart platform” in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.

REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

  • As grocery stores worldwide experienced stockpiling, long lines, and health worries amid the coronavirus pandemic, millions of people turned to shopping online.

  • It has been a goldrush for the British company Ocado, an online-only grocery marketplace that also operates technology for supermarket giants worldwide.

  • Ocado was the best performing stock on the FTSE 100 in the second quarter of 2020, and, in May, Ocado raised over $1 billion to grow its services.

  • It is now betting big on its US expansion, hoping to convert Americans to grocery shopping online.

  • Huge challenges remain, though. Many Americans are still reluctant to buy food they can’t see in person, and some fear the current online pandemic-driven boom could prove a one-off.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus

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